How Tall Are Restaurant Tables, Chairs, & Bar Stools?

Ever wondered how tall the tables, chairs, and bar stools in your restaurant are?  If so, you’re not alone.  One of the most frequently asked questions that we receive is “is there a standard height for restaurant furniture”.  The answer is yes.

Restaurant furniture dimensions are an industry standard, but not one that is designed and administered by any governing body.  Nevertheless, most manufacturers adhere to the standards, at least loosely.  The reason for standardization is simple: having a standard ensures that the chairs that you buy from one manufacturer will fit under the tables that you buy from another manufacturer.  Without standardization, you would need to measure every table and chair before you bought them to be sure they would fit.

What are the standard furniture heights?

Even though there is an informal standard, manufacturers are not bound the exact height, so tables and chairs can vary by as much as an inch or two, depending on the style and thickness of materials used.

Table height chairs, counter height stools, and bar height stools

Table Height

Standard table height tables are 30” tall, a comfortable height that is easy for patrons to reach, while allowing them to rest their feet on the ground.  It also fits wheelchairs well, so it is perfect for ADA compliance.

Standard table height chairs are 18” from the top of the seat to the ground, which leaves a 10”-12” to the bottom of the table for your customer’s legs.

Counter Height

Standard counters and counter height tables are 36” tall.  You won’t find too many commercial quality restaurant counter height tables or bases on the market.  The reason is that most restaurants stick with either table or bar height.

Standard Counter Height Stools are 24”, which again leaves 10-12” of leg room for customers.  Counter height stools are more popular for residences because they fit perfectly under a 36” kitchen counter.  Commercial quality stools are more difficult to find due to the fact that most restaurants don’t have counters anymore.

Bar Height

Standard bar height tables are 42” tall.  Bar height tables and bases are very common, and many different materials and styles are available.   Often, restaurant designers will use bar height tables to create different height levels and lines of site.  For example, if you have a dance floor or a performance stage, adding bar height tables makes it easier for the people in the back to see the performance.  An addition reason that

Standard bar height stools are 30” from the top of the seat to the ground; they fit well under both bars and bar height tables.  Bar stools are available in a wide range of styles and materials because they are so common in restaurants, bars, casinos, and resorts.

 

 

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How to fix wobbly tables – FAQ’s from the Files of East Coast Chair & Barstool

We’ve all been there.  It’s date night and you’re out eating dinner at your favorite restaurant; the food is great, the ambiance is perfect, and the company is lovely, but…this darn table won’t stop wobbling.  It’s maddening.  Like a mosquito near your ear, it’s all you can think about.  You carefully put your drinks toward the center of the table and pray that you’re not wearing your wife’s cabernet before the nights over.

If you’re a restaurant owner or manager, the scenario above is the last thing that you want to happen.  You want your customers to leave dreaming about your food, or the great time they had, not complaining about your tables.  Fortunately, a wobbly table is usually easily fixed, either for free, or for a minimal cost.  So, it’s worth it in terms of customer satisfaction to fix them.

What makes a table wobble?

Most of the time a table is wobbly because the floor that it rests on is not perfectly level or flat.  In fact, any good contractor will tell you that there is no such thing as a perfectly level floor.  If you don’t believe us, put a laser level on your floor and you will most likely find that it isn’t perfectly level.

Another reason that tables become wobbly is because they are moved frequently from spot to spot.  Many table bases have adjustable levelers at the bottom of the base that are used to level the base on a particular section of floor.  If the base was leveled for one area of the floor and then moved, it may need re-adjusted.  This is an easy, free fix that many employees are not trained properly on.

In rarer instances, you might find that one of the base legs is damaged, screws are loose or missing, or a glide is missing on your table base.   If the table is damaged, then you should take it out of service until it is either fixed or replaced.

So how can you fix wobbly tables?

  • If you have a 4 leg table, try the ¼ turn test. Start rotating the table slowly until you find the spot where the table is level and stops wobbling – it’s mathematically proven that somewhere between 0 and 25 degrees, you will find a spot.
  • If your base has table levelers, adjust the leveler that is off of the ground by screwing it counter clockwise. This is usually sufficient when there is only a small gap under the base leg.
  • Check your base and table joints and make sure all screws are tight. If a screw is loose, tighten it.
  • Put a rubber wedge under the table leg that has a gap underneath it. Do not use coasters or napkins, as they slide out easily and are a tripping hazard.
  • Move the table to another area of the restaurant with a more level floor

Wobbly tables are an age-old problem; one that can cause a lot of discomfort for your guests and generate bad reviews for your restaurant.  Fortunately, the problem is usually easily solved with the proper know-how.  Now that you are aware of the solutions, train your employees to be on the lookout for wobbly tables, and how to fix them.

 

How many seats do you need to fill your restaurant? FAQ’s from the Files of East Coast Chair & Barstool.

How many seats do you need to fill your restaurant

When it comes time to buy furniture for their restaurants, many new owners ask about the ideal number of seats for the square footage of their dining rooms.   The truth is, like most things, that there is no hard and fast rule for the exact number of seats in your restaurant, but there are guidelines that we are happy to share below.

Restaurant Type Square Feet to Allocate per Person Number of Seats per 1000 SQFT
Fine Dining 20 SQFT 50
Fast Casual / Counter Service 20 SQFT 50
Cafeteria 16 SQFT 60
Fast Food 14 SQFT 70
Banquet Center 10 SQFT 100

These guidelines are just general rules of thumb.  The actual number of seats that you can fit comfortably in your dining area depends on a few different variables.  For example, if you are planning to make heavy use of booth and countertop seating, then you may be able to squeeze in a few more seats.  On the other hand, if you are using oversize furniture or plan to make your aisles wide enough for wheelchairs or tableside service, then you will need to reduce the number of seats.  In the end, it all boils down to common sense, personal preference, and meeting the needs of your business.

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How Much Does Restaurant Furniture Cost? FAQ’s from the files of East Coast Chair & Barstool

How much does restaurant furniture cost
If you’ve ever asked “how much does restaurant furniture cost”, you probably got a somewhat unsatisfactory answer like “it depends on what you get”.  While this is certainly true – restaurant furniture can range from a few thousand dollars up to serious five figure digits – we figured that we could at least layout some common scenarios to give you an approximation of the cost to furnish your restaurant.

To keep it simple, all of these scenarios are based on a dining space of 1500 square feet with 20 tables, 8 booths, 60 chairs, and 10 bar stools.  There are 3 scenarios: a budget friendly option for a restaurant owner that wants the most economical furniture to get started, a mid-level option for a restaurant owner that wants great looking furniture at a great price, and an option for a restaurant owner that wants to create an ambiance around their furniture without breaking the bank.

Scenario 1 – Economy Furniture Cost

20 – Resin 36” x 36” Table Tops = $600

60 – Gladiator Metal Ladder Back Chairs with Vinyl Seat = $1500

10 – Gladiator Metal Ladder Back Barstools with Vinyl Seat = $500

8 – Standard Vinyl Upholstered Booths = $1500

Furniture Cost = $4100.00

 

Scenario 2 – Mid-Level Furniture Cost

20 – Solid Wood Butcher Block Tables = $2920

60 – Viktor Steel TOLIX style restaurant chairs = $3780

10 – Viktor Steel TOLIX style barstools – $710

8 – Vinyl Upholstered Restaurant Booths – $1640

Furniture Cost = $9050.00

 

Scenario 3 – Reclaimed Wood Furniture Cost

20 – Reclaimed Barnwood Tables = $4400

60 – Simon Steel Café Chairs with Reclaimed Wood Seats = $6000

10 – Simon Steel Café Barstools with Reclaimed Wood Seats = $1100

8 – Custom Reclaimed Barn Wood Booths = $4200

Furniture Cost = $15700.00

 

All of these scenarios are based on just a few of the furniture options that are commonly available at East Coast Chair & Barstool, where we sell direct to restaurants and keep costs low by cutting out the middle man.  True, you could go to a dealer or niche manufacturer and buy furniture that cost 3-5x more, but the only difference would be the price tag.

Have a question about furniture cost?  Leave a comment below and we’ll be glad to help.

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How do I choose a restaurant table base? FAQ’s from the Files of East Coast Chair & Barstool

So, you’ve finally found those tabletops that are going to look perfect in your restaurant, but which bases should you choose to accompany them?  Believe it or not, this is one of the most common questions that our customer care team receives.  The answer is both surprisingly straightforward and difficult at the same time; there are many different variables involved, including personal taste, location, and cost.  Fortunately, after fielding this question from customers far too many times to count, we are ideally positioned to answer it for our readers.  Here are 3 of the most important factors to consider when choosing a base, as well as advice on how to choose the right table bases.

Location

The first consideration when choosing a table base is location.  Specifically, will you be using the table indoors or outdoors?  Most outdoor table bases are constructed from aluminum, stainless steel, powder coated steel, or cast iron.  If you live in a coastal area with high levels of salinity in the air, then aluminum is a great choice because it will offer the best protection against rust and/or corrosion.  If salt spray isn’t an issue for you, then you can choose between any of the outdoor base materials.

Table Shape & Size

Ok, this is where it starts to get a little complicated.  The shape and size of your table is the biggest factor in what type and size of base you choose.  Have you ever gone to a restaurant and leaned on the table only to have it start tipping over?  If so, that’s because the table wasn’t properly supported by the base.  That happens a lot with rectangular tables and large heavy tables.  Often, customers will call in and want a single base in the middle of a 30” x 48” rectangular table.  While that may work with a lightweight laminate or plywood table, it won’t offer the support needed for a heavy solid wood or resin table.  What we recommend is putting one smaller t-style base at each end of the table so that it is supported from the ends instead of the middle.   The same idea applies to large square and round tables as well.

Weight

The weight of the base that you choose is also important.  In general, the weight of your base should coincide with the weight of your table.   Lightweight tables like melamine, laminates, and aluminum tables go best with lighter x-style bases, while heavier tables like solid wood, and resin pair well with heavier disc and plate style bases.

There are a few other considerations with regard to weight.  If you move your tables frequently – perhaps you host events – you may want to go with a lighter weight base that is easier to move.  The other special consideration is if you are using an umbrella on an outdoor table.  In that case, you will either need to choose a heavy base that is specifically designed to accept an umbrella, or choose a leg style table base that will also allow you to use a heavy umbrella base.

While there is no “one size fits all” algorithm for choosing the right table base for your restaurant, we can give you the guidelines and our recommendations.  The chart and infographic below should make it a much easier process.

Common restaurant table base styles

Common shapes and sizes of restaurant tables and their accompanying bases

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What is commercial furniture? FAQs from the Files of East Coast Chair & Barstool

Commercial furniture in a bar

Our sales team often gets asked about the difference is between commercial and residential furniture.  After all, the thinking goes, a chair is a chair and a table is a table, regardless of whether you buy it from a retail location or a commercial dealer.  Unfortunately, that line of thinking is false for a number of reasons.

Despite the fact that some designers and furniture buyers have taken to choosing residential grade furniture for offices, there are significant benefits to choosing commercial quality furnishings for any business in the hospitality industry.

How often do you sit on the dining chairs in your home?  If you’re like most people, the answer is probably an hour or less per day.  Contrast that to restaurants, bars, and other hospitality industry establishments where the furniture is likely to be in use for up to 10-12 hours per day, every day.     Getting ten times, or even more, usage than a typical residential chair means that commercial furniture is subjected to far more stress in its lifetime.  That stress can weaken the integrity of the chair if not properly constructed.  In addition, while you and your family and friends are the only ones sitting on your dining chairs, commercial furniture is used by people of all shapes and sizes.  In fact, most commercial chairs are weight tested up to 350 pounds, and some can accommodate much more.

In most industries, there are differences between commercial and retail equipment, and each is specifically manufactured for that purpose.  For example, a trucking company would never put regular passenger tires on one of its vehicles because their thin walls are not suitable to bear the weight commercial vehicle.  Likewise, a retail customer would not want to put commercial tires on their Ford Focus because the heavy walled tires would produce a jarring, uncomfortable ride.  The same is true of furniture.

The difference between commercial and residential furniture has nothing to do with looks, although residential furniture is often considered more aesthetically pleasing.  Instead, it’s all about construction.  As we said above, commercial furniture has to withstand continuous usage and abuse at the hands of customers and staff.  Because of that, it is built with heavier materials.  Commercial manufacturers typically use 16 or 18 gauge steel is used instead of the 22 or 24 gauge found in retail furniture.  Whereas residential wood furniture is usually made from cheaper, softer woods like rubberwood, commercial grade wood furniture is made from hardwoods like European Beechwood.  Also, fabrics have to be puncture resistant, tear resistant, and stain resistant, which means vinyl vs. leather and acrylic vs cotton.   Finally, commercial furniture has to hold up when customers of all sizes use it, so it also usually has mortise and tenon joinery, and additional bracing.

Commercial furniture can cost more than residential furniture (although not always), but is actually cheaper when you consider cost per use.  As we mentioned above, commercial furniture can easily get 10 times or more usage than residential furniture, but it often costs only 2-3 times as much, making it very cost effective for restaurants, bars, resorts, and offices.

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